Gaucho Grill - Brentwood

$25 - $50 Recommended New Special Offer

Providing an exquisite menu that features Argentinean cuisine in a hip environment, Gaucho Grill in Brentwood creates palate teasing dishes that guests will enjoy. The menu showcases an arrangement of delicious dishes that utilize Latin herbs and spices like the New York Santa Fe, a succulent 10 ounce Grilled New York steak with sautéed mushrooms over a white wine sauce or the Suprema Napolitana, breaded chicken breast lightly fried with tomato sauce and melted mozzarella cheese. Both use traditional Latin cooking techniques and flavor combinations. Gaucho Grill also offers burgers and sandwiches like the Chicken Chimichurri burger that couples an American staple with a Latin flavor palate, and for the less adventurous, the Angus Cheeseburger with Swiss is also featured on the menu. With its clean, chic atmosphere meshed with traditional yet slightly modern dishes, Gaucho Grill is a fantastic choice for dinner with friends or a romantic date with a loved one, and the service and visually appealing atmosphere will surely entice guests to come back for more.

An Argentinean Oasis in the Middle of Los Angeles

Settled on busy San Vicente Blvd in the upscale Brentwood neighborhood is the quiet Gaucho Grill, master of Argentinean cuisine owned by Adrian Amosa. Cars race—or crawl, in the case of rush hour—by the unassuming restaurant that is sandwiched between several other businesses. However after entering the Argentinean establishment, diners are magically transported to an oasis in the middle of the busy streets of LA.

Gaucho Grill first opened its doors in 1986, but in 2008 changed hands to Amosa. Since then, he has expanded to several locations, including this one in Brentwood and another in Long Beach. The restaurant has undergone recent renovation to reflect the authentic Argentinean cuisine featured on the menu. With its delicate use of spices, Argentinean food unites fresh elements like citrus and herbs with grilled meats without an overbearing blend of flavors.

My dining companion and I easily find parking in a small lot just two doors down from the restaurant and walk up to the entrance, passing large windows that allow a glimpse into the dining room. As soon as the door closes behind us, the hustle and bustle of the Los Angeles lifestyle is left behind, and we are greeted by the gentle beats of Argentinean music mixed with the occasional American soft-rock tune. We are welcomed warmly by the hostess who directs us to a large wooden table next to the window.

From our vantage point, we can easily see into the whole dining room, which is separated into Settled on busy San Vicente Blvd in the upscale Brentwood neighborhood is the quiet Gaucho Grill, master of Argentinean cuisine owned by Adrian Amosa. Cars race—or crawl, in the case of rush hour—by the unassuming restaurant that is sandwiched between several other businesses.  However after entering the Argentinean establishment, diners are magically transported to an oasis in the middle of the busy streets of LA.

Gaucho Grill first opened its doors in 1986, but in 2008 changed hands to Amosa. Since then, he has expanded to several locations, including this one in Brentwood and another in Long Beach. The restaurant has undergone recent renovation to reflect the authentic Argentinean cuisine featured on the menu. With its delicate use of spices, Argentinean food unites fresh elements like citrus and herbs with grilled meats without an overbearing blend of flavors.

My dining companion and I easily find parking in a small lot just two doors down from the restaurant and walk up to the entrance, passing large windows that allow a glimpse into the dining room. As soon as the door closes behind us, the hustle and bustle of the Los Angeles lifestyle is left behind, and we are greeted by the gentle beats of Argentinean music mixed with the occasional American soft-rock tune. We are welcomed warmly by the hostess who directs us to a large wooden table next to the window.

From our vantage point, we can easily see into the whole dining room, which is separated into three sections. A set of tables that line the left wall has chairs sporting various faux animal hides. The walls feature sections of uneven bricks in layers that simulate an outdoor seating environment, while the ceilings consist of thin wooden beams along a cream background. The laid-back atmosphere is intimate but not forced. It’s a wonderful place to take a date for a romantic dinner in a land far away from the ordinary. Once we settle in at our table, our server, Daniel, greets us warmly and brings two glasses of water. He offers his assistance should we have any questions before leaving us to browse the menu.

There is a large variety of options, with vegetarian choices and even dishes for the picky eater, making Gaucho Grill a great place for adults and children alike. The menu displays a wide array of appetizers and salads, like the simple Chorizo Argentino and the anything but boring Primavera Salad. There are also standard Cheese, Veggie, and not-so-American burgers, such as the Lomito con Queso. In addition, the menu features impeccable pasta dishes like the Ravioli Alfredo, Meatballs Spinach Fettuccini, and Chicken Ravioli. Meat, chicken, and fish options abound, like the Bife al Portobello, Salmon Papillotte, and Chicken al Carbon, complemented by simple sides that allow the delicately prepared entrée to shine on its own. Finally, save room for the tempting dessert menu that features several equally delightful options, like the Chocolate Mousse and Flan con Dulce de Leche. The restaurant is also open during the week for lunch, which is served until 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, during which diners may choose from a smaller Executive Lunch Menu that carries items from the regular menu in lunch-sized portions at a slightly lower price and includes one soft drink.

As if all that were not enough, Gaucho Grill also boasts an extensive wine list of Argentinean Boutique and Californian wines by the glass and bottle, with reds, whites, and sparkling varieties such as Malbecs, Pinot noirs, Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignons, and Syrahs to please any wine aficionado. Beer lovers need not despair as they also offer a selection of domestic and imported brews.

Daniel returns with a basket of baguette slices, accompanied by a chimichurri sauce. He leaves us to taste it while he goes to get me the glass of wine he recommended, a red Argentinean Malbec. I found that the best way to eat the chimichurri is to spoon it directly onto the bread, allowing it to seep through the entire slice. The spread has spiced olive oil, with chopped parsley and a gentle red pepper flavor. Because the bread is lightly toasted, it is strong enough to hold up the oil and still retain a slight crunch. Daniel returns with the wine and goes to place our appetizer order. The Malbec is fruity with berry notes, but not too sweet or heavy.

Our appetizers arrive soon after the wine. First is the Provoleta, served in a small sizzling cast iron skillet. The dish consists of melted cheese topped with a few thin slices of tomato. As soon as I cut into it, the crisp, lightly browned crust on the bottom of the cheese is immediately noticeable with its contrast in both color and texture to the light creamy cheese on top. The first bite yields the hidden flecks of basil and oregano sprinkled throughout, and it tastes like a pizza without the crust, especially when paired with the al dente tomato slices, which adds just enough freshness to cut the richness of the cheese. While the dish itself is not greasy or heavy like a pizza topping, this dish would be best for those who truly love their cheese.

Next up is the Spinach and Cheese Empanada, which comes on a small white plate with a scattering of chopped parsley leaves across the top. Instantly I notice the brown, crispy exterior, which looks flaky from the lack of oil.  The filling is a creamy mixture of a mild cheese and chopped spinach, and despite the rich flavor, it’s not greasy. There are bits of chopped red bell pepper mixed into the filling that adds a nice mild spice to the dish.

As we finish our appetizers and the plates are cleared, my friend and I are allowed a few minutes to relax and discuss our meal thus far and sip our wine. Daniel soon arrives with the Grilled Salmon Salad, which we get chopped and tossed as recommended. As soon as he puts it down, we are able to see why he suggested that preparation. Each component of the salad is visible throughout the entire dish, and the vibrant colors from the salmon and a mix of onions, tomatoes, and mushrooms create a color palette that is visual appealing. This is a hot salad, or rather a warm salad, yet the greens are still quite crisp, not wilted or soggy, and the crunch of the chopped tomatoes adds a nice texture. The salmon is grilled flawlessly, so that it is still juicy and delicate. Sautéed onions add a wonderful caramelized flavor to complement the fish and it is all lightly dressed with just the right amount of vinaigrette. The salad relies more on the freshness and flavor of each ingredient rather than added flavors from the pantry, making it a standout dish among the rest.

After the salad is cleared away, we are again permitted some time to digest our food before the next course arrives. Although the tables have all begun to fill up around us, we never get the sense that we are being rushed out of the restaurant. In fact, it is just the opposite: to enjoy our meal at our own pace.

After a few minutes, our main entrees arrive: Entraña a la Parrilla and Cuban Chicken Paliard. The first dish, Entraña a la Parrilla, is a thin Argentinean-style skirt steak cooked to my liking, which I asked for medium rare. When I see how thin the steak is, I’m sure it will still be pink in the middle, but much to my pleasure it is cooked absolutely to my specification. The meat is well seasoned, accompanied by slightly spicy notes and hints of olive oil that keeps it tender and moist, allowing me to cut though it like butter. I could easily eat just the steak because it stands very well on its own, but as it is accompanied by brightly colored green beans and creamy mashed potatoes, I can’t resist a bite (or three) of each. The beans are cooked through yet still retain their crunch, and the flakes of sea salt sprinkled on top are a lovely way to add a bit of flavor while still allowing the freshness of the beans to speak for itself. The mashed potatoes are not overly salty or peppery, but give off a hint of garlic without being overpowering. The ingredients all mix so well that I can’t help but take a few forkfuls containing a taste of all three components at once.

I take just a minute to allow my palate to cleanse with a few sips of lemon water before I succumb to the enticing smell of the Cuban Chicken Paliard, accompanied with sautéed onions and a touch of pepper. Covered with sautéed onions, the chicken is moist and bursting with freshness. I take several bites before I can even think about what the delicious coating consists of. The subtle Dijon marinade adds just the right amount of spice without overwhelming the chicken, and creates a delicious sauce for the onions on top. The onions are not caramelized, but softened, just enough to cook out the sometimes overbearing onion taste and add another dimension of flavor to the chicken. There are plenty to ensure that each bite of chicken will have several strands of onion. Alongside the meat are a small bowl of black beans and a side of rice. The beans simply must be mixed into the rice — which emits both the subtle taste and bright yellow color of saffron, and hints of red bell pepper — to create a wonderfully seasoned side dish.

Daniel comes to refill our wine glasses and clear away the empty plates. We sit for quite a while, soaking in the music and atmosphere, before deciding to take the plunge and finish off our meal with dessert. We order the Panqueques con Dulce de Leche — crepes filled with a homemade dulce de leche. The plate arrives and for a moment, I am unable to dig in because of the beautiful presentation. There are two small rolled crepes in the center of the white square ceramic plate, with a dark dulce de leche sauce drizzled all over, a small dollop of whipped cream, a sliced strawberry just to the side, and powdered sugar sprinkled in each corner of the plate. Together, they create an image that’s stunningly picturesque. Sadly, I take my first bite of the crepe, destroying the work of art with one fell swoop. However, my heavy heart quickly washes away and I am stunned by the delicateness of the crepe itself, and the richness of the dulce de leche that oozes out of it. My next bite is slightly crunchy and sweet, thanks to a thin layer of sugar bruleed on top of the crepe. It adds just the right amount of sweetness to the crepe and sauce, which are not overly sweet themselves, and the textural element of the brulee completes the whole package. Between the two of us, the crepes last mere minutes, and we certainly enjoy every bite of it.

Daniel clears our plate and asks us if there is anything else he can do to which we respond that we simply could not eat another bite, though we certainly would like to. He gives us a smile and wishes us a wonderful evening. We sit and chat on what feels like our very own outdoor patio in Argentina for a little while longer, discussing the wonderful food and ambience. Finally my guest and I get up and say goodbye to the staff, who wish us a good night. While walking out the door, the rush of traffic and pedestrians instantly welcomes us back to Los Angeles, but we will remember the lovely vacation my guest and I just had, eagerly awaiting the next opportunity to travel back to South America, if only just for one more meal.

Insider Tip: For a romantic atmosphere, request to sit farther from the windows at the front. Without the distraction of the outside world rushing by, couples can focus on each other and the wistful ambience created by the music and décor.

After a few minutes, our main entrees arrive: Entraña a la Parrilla and Cuban Chicken Paliard. The first dish, Entraña a la Parrilla, is a thin Argentinean-style skirt steak cooked to my liking, which I asked for medium rare. When I see how thin the steak is, I’m sure it will still be pink in the middle, but much to my pleasure it is cooked absolutely to my specification. The meat is well seasoned, accompanied by slightly spicy notes and hints of olive oil that keeps it tender and moist, allowing me to cut though it like butter. I could easily eat just the steak because it stands very well on its own, but as it is accompanied by brightly colored green beans and creamy mashed potatoes, I can’t resist a bite (or three) of each. The beans are cooked through yet still retain their crunch, and the flakes of sea salt sprinkled on top are a lovely way to add a bit of flavor while still allowing the freshness of the beans to speak for itself. The mashed potatoes are not overly salty or peppery, but give off a hint of garlic without being overpowering. The ingredients all mix so well that I can’t help but take a few forkfuls containing a taste of all three components at once.

I take just a minute to allow my palate to cleanse with a few sips of lemon water before I succumb to the enticing smell of the Cuban Chicken Paliard, accompanied with sautéed onions and a touch of pepper. Covered with sautéed onions, the chicken is moist and bursting with freshness. I take several bites before I can even think about what the delicious coating consists of. The subtle Dijon marinade adds just the right amount of spice without overwhelming the chicken, and creates a delicious sauce for the onions on top. The onions are not caramelized, but softened, just enough to cook out the sometimes overbearing onion taste and add another dimension of flavor to the chicken. There are plenty to ensure that each bite of chicken will have several strands of onion. Alongside the meat are a small bowl of black beans and a side of rice. The beans simply must be mixed into the rice — which emits both the subtle taste and bright yellow color of saffron, and hints of red bell pepper — to create a wonderfully seasoned side dish. 

Daniel comes to refill our wine glasses and clear away the empty plates. We sit for quite a while, soaking in the music and atmosphere, before deciding to take the plunge and finish off our meal with dessert. We order the Panqueques con Dulce de Leche — crepes filled with a homemade dulce de leche. The plate arrives and for a moment, I am unable to dig in because of the beautiful presentation. There are two small rolled crepes in the center of the white square ceramic plate, with a dark dulce de leche sauce drizzled all over, a small dollop of whipped cream, a sliced strawberry just to the side, and powdered sugar sprinkled in each corner of the plate. Together, they create an image that’s stunningly picturesque. Sadly, I take my first bite of the crepe, destroying the work of art with one fell swoop. However, my heavy heart quickly washes away and I am stunned by the delicateness of the crepe itself, and the richness of the dulce de leche that oozes out of it. My next bite is slightly crunchy and sweet, thanks to a thin layer of sugar bruleed on top of the crepe. It adds just the right amount of sweetness to the crepe and sauce, which are not overly sweet themselves, and the textural element of the brulee completes the whole package. Between the two of us, the crepes last mere minutes, and we certainly enjoy every bite of it.

Daniel clears our plate and asks us if there is anything else he can do to which we respond that we simply could not eat another bite, though we certainly would like to. He gives us a smile and wishes us a wonderful evening. We sit and chat on what feels like our very own outdoor patio in Argentina for a little while longer, discussing the wonderful food and ambience. Finally my guest and I get up and say goodbye to the staff, who wish us a good night. While walking out the door, the rush of traffic and pedestrians instantly welcomes us back to Los Angeles, but we will remember the lovely vacation my guest and I just had, eagerly awaiting the next opportunity to travel back to South America, if only just for one more meal.

Insider Tip: For a romantic atmosphere, request to sit farther from the windows at the front. Without the distraction of the outside world rushing by, couples can focus on each other and the wistful ambience created by the music and décor.

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  Restaurant Info

  • 11754 San Vicente Blvd
    Brentwood CA 90049
  • Address: 11754 San Vicente Blvd, Brentwood CA 90049
  • Cross Street: Gorham Avenue
  • Location: Beverly Hills & Westside | Brentwood
  • Cuisine: Argentinean | Latin | South American | Steak |
  • Cost: $$ | Inexpensive | $25 - $50
  • Category: Fine Dining
  • Star Rating:
  • Reservations: Available
  • Dress Code: Casual
  • Meals Served: Dinner |
  • Parking: Street |
  • Payment Options: VISA | Amex | MasterCard | Discover |
  • Corkage Fee: N/A
  • Phone: (310) 447-7898

  Business Hours

Monday
| Lunch 11:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
| Dinner 4 p.m. - 10 p.m.
Tuesday
| Lunch 11:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
| Dinner 4 p.m. - 10 p.m.
Wednesday
| Lunch 11:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
| Dinner 4 p.m. - 10 p.m.
Thursday
| Lunch 11:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
| Dinner 4 p.m. - 10 p.m.
Friday
| Lunch 11:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
| Dinner 4 p.m. - 10:30 p.m.
Saturday
| Lunch 11:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
| Dinner 4 p.m. - 10:30 p.m.
Sunday
| Lunch 11:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
| Dinner 4 p.m. - 10 p.m.

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Lunch Menu

Lunch Specials

Dinner Menu

Appetizers

Salads

Steaks

Chicken

Burgers & Sandwiches

Pasta

Fish

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